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Sunder Kand

Sunder Kand — The fifth book is Sundara Kanda, which narrates the heroism of Hanuman, his flight to Lanka and meeting with Sita.

Sunder Kand Introduction & Doha 1

English

I adore the Lord of the universe bearing the name of Rama, the Chief of Raghu’s line and the crest-jewel of kings, the mine of compassion, the dispeller of all sins, appearing in human form through His Maya (deluding potency), the greatest of all gods, knowable through Vedanta (the Upanisads), constantly worshipped by Brahma (the Creator), Sambhu (Lord Siva) and Sesa (the serpent-god), the bestower of supreme peace in the form of final beatitude, placid, eternal, beyond the ordinary means of cognition, sinless and all-pervading.

There is no other craving in my heart, O Lord of the Raghus: I speak the truth and You are the Spirit indwelling the hearts of all. Grant me intense devotion to Your feet, O crest-jewel of Raghus, and free my mind from faults like concupiscence etc.

I bow to the son of the wind-god, the beloved devotee of Sri Rama (the Lord of the Raghus), the chief of the monkeys, the repository of all virtues, the foremost among the wise, a fire to consume the forest of the demon race, possessing a body shining as a mountain of gold and a home of immeasurable strength.

Hanuman was much delighted at heart to hear the heartening speech of Jambavan. He said, “Suffering hardships and living on bulbs, roots and fruits, wait for me, brethren, till I return after seeing Sita. I am sure our object will be accomplished as I feel very cheerful.” So saying and after bowing his head to them all he set out full of joy with an image of Sri Rama (the Lord of the Raghus) enshrined in his heart. There was a beautiful hill on the seacoast; he lightly sprang on to its top. And invoking the Hero of Raghus line again and again, the son of the wind-god took a leap with all his might. The hill on which Hanuman planted his foot while leaping sank down immediately into the nethermost region (Patala). Hanuman sped forth in the same way as the unerring shaft of Sri Rama (the Lord of the Raghus). Knowing him to be Sri Rama’s emissary, the deity presiding over the ocean spoke to mount Mainaka, “Relieve him of his fatigue, O Mainaka (by allowing him to rest on you).”

Hanuman simply touched the mountain with his hand and then made obeisance to it saying, “There can be no rest for me till I have accomplished Sri Rama’s work.”

The gods saw the son of the wind-god sweeping along; and in order to test his extraordinary strength and intelligence they sent Surasa, a mother of serpents, who came near him and said: “The gods have provided me a meal today.” On hearing these words the son of the wind-god said in reply, “Let me return after accomplishing Sri Rama’s errand and tell my lord the news of Sita. Then I will approach you and enter your mouth; I tell you the truth. Mother, only let me go now.” When, however, she would not let him go on any account, Hanuman said, “Then why not devour me?” She distended her mouth to a distance of eight miles, while the chief of monkeys grew double the size of her mouth. She stretched her mouth to a circumference of a hundred and twenty-eight miles, and the son of the wind-god immediately took a form covering two hundred and fifty-six miles. Even as Surasa expanded her jaws the chief of the monkeys manifested a form twice as large as her mouth. When she further expanded her mouth eight hundred miles wide, the son of the wind-god assumed a very minute form, by which he entered her mouth and came out again and bowing his head to her begged leave to proceed. “I have gauged the extent of your wit and strength, the errand for which the gods had despatched me.

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