Education & Reference Questions & Answers

Education & Reference Questions & Answers

Why do pirates wear a black patch over one eye?

There is one theory that the eye patch was worn over one eye so the pirate could move between the darkness of below-deck to the brightness of topside without waiting for the eyes to adjust. Another theory: the eye patch stereotype predates the “Golden Age of Piracy” by some 200 years. Up until the 1500s one of the key tools …

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Why do not trees grow on mountain tops?

Trees do not grow on mountain tops either because the situation is too exposed, or because the soil is too thin or too frozen to allow their roots to draw nourishment from the ground. In most mountainous areas there is usually a clearly marked timberline, a boundary above which there is no tree growth. Sometimes the height of the timberline …

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Why did Arnold Bennett write under the nom-de-plume of “Gwendolyn”?

Because he first started writing on the staff of a women’s periodical. He spent four years writing a gossip column under the odd penname of “Gwendolyn.” He regarded the time thus spent as the most valuable part of his life. He later became the assistant editor and then editor of a weekly magazine called Woman. His later commet was: “I …

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Whose novel about English Country life was praised by a British Prime Minister?

Mary Webb was born at Leighton, Shropshire on March 25, 1881. Her family name was Meredith and in 1912 she married a school-master, Henry Bertram Webb. In 1914 Mr and Mrs Webb began work as market gardeners and sold their fruit and vegetables on a stall in the market place of Shrewsbury Town. Marry Webb started journalistic work at an …

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Who wrote, illustrated and then published at her own expense The Tale of Peter Rabbit?

Helen Beatrix Potter, born July 6, 1866, paid for only 250 copies of Peter Rabbit to be printed in December 1901. Two months later, a second edition of 250 copies were printed. Later, in 1902, Beatrix Potter (the name she wrote under) published, again at her own cost, The Tailor of Gloucester. 500 copies were published. In the year 1903, …

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Who wrote under the nom-de-plume of Saki?

This was Hector Hugh Munro, born in Burma on November 12, 1870. His fame as a writer rests on his brilliant short stories which have been collected in several volumes such as Reginald, Reginald in Russia and The Chronicles of Clovis. He was only a child when his mother died and, in Devonshire, England, he was brought up by two …

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Who wrote The Wind in the Willows?

It was whilst he was still working as a Bank of England official that Kenneth Grahame published his first work, and it was when he was fifty-nine years old that his masterpiece appeared. He originally wrote The Wind in the Willows, a charming animal fantasy, for his young son, but it soon became a best seller, and has remained so …

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Who wrote the two baffling mystery novels, The Woman in White and The Moonstone?

William Wilkie Collins who was the son of William Collins, the painter. Born in London January 8, 1824, he studied law and was called to the Bar in 1851. He was already writing and in 1850 his novel Antonina had appeared but his high rank in literature stands on his two well-known mystery novels. Wilkie Collins was a close friend …

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