Science & Mathematics Questions & Answers

Science & Mathematics Questions & Answers

Who came up with the concept of vacuum?

In earlier civilizations, there was much doubt about whether vacuum can exist. Ancient Greeks also did not believe vacuum is possible. In the medieval Islamic world, physicist Ibn al-Haytham supported the existence of a void or vacuum. He mathematically demonstrated that place (al-makan) is the imagined three-dimensional void between the inner surfaces of a containing body. The first suction pump …

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Who are the tallest and shortest people?

The Tutsi of Burundi and Rwanda, who are noted for their dancing and high jumping, are, on average, the world’s tallest people. Men over 183 cm (6ft) in height. The world’s shortest people also live in Central Africa. These are the pygmy hunters and gatherers in the forests. Pygmy women average only 135 cm (4ft5in) and men 137 cm (4ft6in)!

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Who are NEO consumers?

The NEO consumers are new high-value consumers of the new economic order (NEO). It is a newly emerging segment of customers from all age groups, ethnicities, income bands, locations and have high propensity to spend their income on disposable goods. NEO consumers are valuable as they consume constantly and favour a sense of investment, discretionary choices and value added services. …

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Which was the largest battleship ever built?

The greatest of the fighting giants of the sea was the Japanese Yamato. She gave her name to a class four battleships designed to be invincible. Yamato displaced 72,000 tons. Her main armament consisted of nine 45.9 cm guns in triple turrets – overwhelmingly superior to any other battleship in the world. The Yamato was completed soon after the Japanese …

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Which was the first public railway worked entirely by steam locomotive?

On 15 September 1830 a train steamed slowly from Liverpool along the new ‘iron road’ to Manchester – the first in a procession of eight locomotives. The occasion was the opening of the Liverpool and Manchester Railway, the first railway in the world to carry goods and passengers. Cheering crowds greeted the Duke of Wellington as his luxurious coach was …

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Which plant has the biggest seed in the plant kingdom?

The nut of the coco de mer, also called giant fan palm, double coconut, Seychelles nut, or Maldive coconut, is considered to be the biggest nut in the entire plant kingdom. It is the size of a coconut, and weighs around 27 kg. The palm is found only in the islands of Praslin and Curieuse of Seychelles in the Indian …

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Which pirate was also an explorer?

William Dampier was a Somerset man who turned pirate, although the ships and town he plundered were usually Spanish. In January 1688 he was second-in-command of a ship called the Cygnet when the coast of New Holland – as Australia was then called – came in sight. The ship was run into a bay to be careened, and Dampier went …

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Which order ‘exceeds in majesty, honour and fame all Chivalrous Orders of the World?

The Most Noble Order of the Garter, the highest British Order of Knighthood, is as sought-after and honoured now as it was over six hundred years ago. The exact date of the foundation of the order, which John Selden, the historian, described as exceeding ‘in majesty, honour and fame all Chivalrous Orders of the World’, is uncertain. One version tells …

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Which missile is nicknamed ‘tin fish’?

The British Navy’s nickname for a torpedo is ‘tin fish’. It is an underwater powered projectile which can be launched from a ship, submarine or aeroplane to explode against a hostile ship. Robert Whitehead, a British engineer, designed the first self-propelled torpedo over a hundred years ago. Torpedoes strike their target below water. When a shell or bomb explodes above …

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