Mammals Encyclopedia

Chamois

Chamois — The chamois (Rupicapra rupicapra) is a goat-like animal native to the European Alps, the Corno Grande region of the central Italian Apennines, the Tatra Mountains, the Balkans, parts of Turkey, and the Caucasus. The species was also introduced on the South Island of New Zealand. Chamois are strictly protected animals under the European Habitats Directive. There are two …

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Cuscus

Cuscus — A cuscus is a MARSUPIAL of the genus Phalanger, family Phalangeridae, and is similar to the monkey. Seven species of these nocturnal, slow-moving tree-dwellers are found in Australia, New Guinea, and the nearby islands. In some species, the sexes are differentiated by color. Cuscus vary in length from 33 to 64 cm (13 to 25 in), have a …

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Deer

Deer — A deer is a ruminant mammal belonging to the family Cervidae. A number of broadly similar animals from related families within the order Artiodactyla (even-toed ungulates) are often also called deer. Male deer grow and shed new antlers each year, as opposed to antelope, which are in the same order and bear a superficial resemblance to deer physically, …

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Capuchin

Capuchin — The capuchins are the group of New World monkeys classified as genus Cebus. Their name comes from their coloration, which resembles the cowls worn by the Franciscan Capuchin order of Catholic friars. Cebus is the only genus in subfamily Cebinae. The range of the capuchin monkeys includes Central America (Honduras) and middle South America (middle Brazil, eastern Peru, …

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Camel

Camel — Camels are even-toed ungulates within the genus Camelus. The dromedary, one-humped or Arabian camel has a single hump, and the Bactrian camel has two humps. They are native to the dry desert areas of western Asia, and central and east Asia, respectively. The average life expectancy of a camel is fifty to sixty years. The term camel is …

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Bongo

Bongo — The Western or Lowland Bongo, Tragelaphus eurycerus eurycerus, is a herbivorous, mostly nocturnal forest ungulate and among the largest of the African forest antelope species. Bongos are characterised by a striking reddish-brown coat, black and white markings, white-yellow stripes and long slightly spiralled horns. Indeed, bongos are the only Tragelaphid in which both sexes have horns. Bongos have …

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Cacomistle

Cacomistle — The Cacomistle (Bassariscus sumichrasti) is a nocturnal arboreal omnivore. Its preferred habitat are wet, tropical evergreen woodlands and mountain forests, though seasonally it will inhabit drier deciduous forests. Nowhere in its range (from southern Mexico to western Panama) is B. sumichrasti common. This is especially true in Costa Rica, where it inhabits only a very small area. It …

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Buffalo

Buffalo — The domestic buffalo or domestic Asian water buffalo is abundant in Asia, and South America. It is a large ungulate and a member of the bovine subfamily. There are established feral populations in northern Australia, and wild populations in much of Southeast Asia. All its domestic varieties and breeds descend from one common ancestor, the wild Asian water …

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Bobcat

Bobcat — The bobcat (Lynx rufus), occasionally known as the bay lynx, is a North American mammal of the cat family, Felidae. With twelve recognized subspecies, it ranges from southern Canada to northern Mexico, including most of the continental United States. The bobcat is an adaptable predator that inhabits wooded areas, as well as semi-desert, urban edge, and swampland environments. …

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