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UK World Record: World's first robotic eye surgery

UK World Record: World’s first robotic eye surgery

Oxford, UK – October 4, 2016- Surgeons at John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford, have carried out the world’s first internal eye operation using a robot, remotely controlling the machine to lift a membrane 100th of a millimetre thick from a patient’s retina, thus setting the new world record for the World’s first robotic eye surgery.

University of Oxford surgeons at Oxford’s John Radcliffe Hospital have performed the world’s first operation inside the eye using a robot. Robert MacLaren, Professor of Ophthalmology. assisted by Dr Thomas Edwards, Nuffield Medical Fellow, used the remotely controlled robot to lift a membrane 100th of a millimetre thick from the retina at the back of the right eye of the Revd Dr William Beaver, 70, an Associate Priest at St Mary the Virgin, Iffley, Oxford.

Photo: University of Oxford surgeons at Oxford’s John Radcliffe Hospital have performed the world’s first operation inside the eye using a robot. Robert MacLaren, Professor of Ophthalmology. assisted by Dr Thomas Edwards, Nuffield Medical Fellow, used the remotely controlled robot to lift a membrane 100th of a millimetre thick from the retina at the back of the right eye of the Revd Dr William Beaver, 70, an Associate Priest at St Mary the Virgin, Iffley, Oxford.

The Guinness World Records world record for the largest CPR training session involved 11,840 participants and was organised by Klinik für Anästhesiologie, operative Intensivmedizin und Schmerztherapie Münster (Germany), in Münster, Germany, on 17 September 2013.

Guinness World Records also recognized the world record for the youngest open heart surgery patient is Chanel Murrish (UK, b. 24 February 2014) who was one minute old when she had the operation, in Tyne and Wear, Newcastle, UK, on 24 February 2014.

The Robotic Retinal Dissection Device (R2D2) is designed to mitigate against tiny tremors in surgeons’ hands, which can even be caused by their pulse.

Built by Dutch medical robotics firm Preceyes BV, it has seven independent computer-controlled motors and acts like a mechanical hand. Using a joystick, a touchscreen and an operating microscope, the surgeon’s movements are converted into robotic manoeuvres as precise as 1000th of a millimetre.

In this instance, Professor of Ophthalmology Robert MacLaren entered the eye of Reverend Dr William Beaver via a hole less than 1mm in diameter. The 70-year-old priest had a membrane growing on his retina that was distorting his vision. At just 100th of a millimetre thick, this membrane had to be dissected off the retina without damaging it.

The operation has so far been a success and Father Beaver’s vision is improving.

The trial is sponsored by the University of Oxford and funded by the NIHR Oxford Biomedical Research Centre, with support from Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, and additional funding from Dutch blindness charity Zizoz.

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