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The Pumpkins Are Here

Sing Halloween poem on the tune of

Author: Mary > The carved pumpkin, lit by a candle inside, is one of Halloween's most prominent symbols. This is an Irish tradition of carving a lantern which goes back centuries. These lanterns are usually carved from a turnip or swede (or more uncommonly a mangelwurzel). The carving of pumpkins was first associated with Halloween in North America, where the pumpkin was available, and much larger and easier to carve. Many families that celebrate Halloween carve a pumpkin into a frightening or comical face and place it on their home's doorstep after dark.

The jack-o'-lantern can be traced back to the Irish legend of Stingy Jack, a greedy, gambling, hard drinking old farmer who tricked the devil into climbing a tree, and trapped him by carving a cross into the trunk of the tree. In revenge, the devil placed a curse on Jack which dooms him to forever wander the earth at night. For centuries, the bedtime parable was told by Irish parents to their children. But in America the tradition of carving pumpkins is known to have preceded the Great Famine period of Irish immigration, and the tradition of carving vegetable lanterns may also have been brought over by the Scottish or English; documentation is unavailable to establish when or by whom. The carved pumpkin was associated generally with harvest time in America, and did not become specifically associated with Halloween until the mid to late 19th century.

 
 

The pumpkins are here;
The pumpkins are there.
The pumpkins, the pumpkins
are everywhere.

The pumpkins are up;
the pumpkins are down.
The pumpkins, the pumpkins
are all around.

The pumpkins are in;
the pumpkins are out.
The pumpkins, the pumpkins
are all about.

The pumpkins are low;
the pumpkins are high.
The pumpkins, the pumpkins
all say,"Goodbye!"

 

Halloween Nursery Rhymes, Halloween, Pumpkins, Preschool Poetry, Children, School, Mangelwurzel, Carving of Pumpkins, Jack O Lantern, Stingy Jack